Day 26 – Bright Lady

Mar. 27th, 2017 06:20 am
finch: (Default)
[personal profile] finch
Incense and candles are a good all-purpose offering, but I’m fascinated by the variety of things individual powers might prefer. An all-in day for Redbird included:

teaching sex ed to my sunday school kids

receiving the blade-in-chalice ritual of my regular testosterone shot

grocery shopping

spending the afternoon off the computer, taking care of little things around the house and playing with Bug

a spectacular home-cooked meal from my spouse

Basically she wants me to live in the moment and be committed to doing the best I can with what I have. Sometimes that’s medical care and sometimes that’s a nap and sometimes that’s finally getting a shoe rack put together in the entryway.

Hail the Bright Lady, who shines light on my choices. Do what you do with intent, whatever you do.

It seems kind of hard to believe that the month is almost over. It’s definitely time to be finalizing the daily prayers. I’m not sure whether I’ll type them up and make a little booklet for myself or copy them neatly into a notebook but either way they’ll be getting a ‘final’ version so I don’t have to keep flipping forward and back in my bullet journal every night.

from WordPress http://ift.tt/2omC5v7

Monday 27/03/2017

Mar. 27th, 2017 07:47 am
dark_kana: (3_good_things_a_day official icon)
[personal profile] dark_kana posting in [community profile] 3_good_things_a_day
1) Had an awesome weekend away to Brugges with boyfriend. Lovely weather. Wandering around the town. Yum food. It was a super great weekend! <3

2) Great weather to cycle to work. 

3) Going to get my eyes tested this evening.
fairestcat: Dreadful the cat (Default)
[personal profile] fairestcat
Posting this month's playlist late, because I've been distracted reading due South fic and watching, re-watching and re-re-watching RENT (the Broadway version). I'm apparently in a somewhat obsessive mood at the moment, idk.

This month's mix is dedicated to the current political situation, in the US and worldwide. Some old stuff, some new stuff. Some angry, some hopeful, hopefully mostly inspiring.

I'm Gonna Spend the Next Four Years on the Barricades
Zip file on dropbox (131 MB) or Individual tracks on dropbox

Talkin' Bout A Revolution - Tracy Chapman
Where's the Revolution - Depeche Mode
The Sand In the Gears - Frank Turner
Enough Is Enough - Chumbawamba
All You Fascists 2010 - Billy Bragg and his Band
Combat Rock - Sleater-Kinney
Immigrants (We Get the Job Done) - K'naan, Snow Tha Product, Riz MC & Residente
If You Tolerate This Your Children Will Be Next - Manic Street Preachers
Dontfollowtheleader - Headstones
Fuck Police Brutality - Anti-Flag
White Flag Warrior - Flobots Feat. Tim Mcilrath Of Rise Against
Burnin' Streets - Joe Strummer & The Mescaleros
Hey World (Remote Control Version) - Michael Franti and Spearhead
Lovers In A Dangerous Time - Bruce Cockburn
Fishing - Richard Shindell
Weight of the World - Martyn Joseph
We'll Be There - Oysterband
Heads Will Roll - Thea Gilmore
Coming to America - K'naan
¡Viva La Gloria! - Green Day
People Have The Power - Patti Smith
Democracy - Leonard Cohen
Bread and Roses - Brownwen Lewis

I'd love it if you commented if you're downloading, just so I know I'm not posting these out into the void :)

Sunday Stone-Scrabbling

Mar. 26th, 2017 10:01 pm
radiantfracture: and i know which way the wind is blowing (barometer)
[personal profile] radiantfracture
Today was approximately evenly split between napping, working, and walking, which is not such a bad way to go about things when you can.

I have been enjoying the landscapes I've seen in others' posts, have been feeling even a little envious of their moss-banked waterfalls and rugged declivities -- which envy is mad, given where I live, but the sphagnum is always greener, etc.

Therefore, here are a few photos from today's scramble along the rocks in Beacon Hill Park. The path is a bit dodgy at the best of times, and today it was muddy and the rocks were wet, but I find if I'm willing to lower my centre of gravity more than dignity strictly allows, I can achieve some fair progress.

The rocks are something remarkable -- huge rounded whalebacks banded, veined, and streaked with surprising colour.

In the spirit of shared beauty, then: Photos from today's walk )

As I cried out through the wind to S and LB, in my gamin enthusiasm, "This is a downtown park." That's a slight exaggeration, but only a slight one.

{rf}
craterdweller: (SLANG: YAY)
[personal profile] craterdweller posting in [community profile] allbingo
Author: craterdweller
Fandoms: Merlin (BBC), Stargate SG-1, Stargate Atlantis, Buffy the Vampire Slayer
Prompts: Innocence, Science and Magic, Books are the Best Weapons, Day in the Life, Song Inspired

Fills below the cut )

☆☆☆

Mar. 26th, 2017 08:45 pm
yuuago: (YiH - Jaako - Wasn't me)
[personal profile] yuuago
I've hardly been able to write anything but poetry for weeks now. Upside: I've been writing something, and hey, might as well work with that medium a little, why not. And in that format, it's easier to pull out something for canons that, for various reasons, I have difficulty writing prose fic for. Lookin' at you, Small Trolls and Year in Hereafter. Hmph.

I've been trying to put some things together for those two comics due to exchanges - some things related to Ao3 exchanges are easier when the fandoms have an actual category on the site. There's this annoying situation where, if the fandom doesn't have any work for it yet, then if you're posting to an exchange collection, the fandom won't be appear in the collection's fandoms list until someone on Ao3 creates a category for it. And then YiH and SmT have the issue that they both have a character with the same first and last name, and in situations like that, exchange posting is easier when they're already disambiguated behind the scenes, because then the names can appear properly in the drop-down. ...So. Yes. Poetry it is, then. For now.

Today was nice. So mild! +1C! I'm not looking forward to how muddy everything is going to be tomorrow, but it was great to go outside, with only my autumn coat, and without a hat or scarf or gloves. Oh man. Felt so good. I can hardly wait until I can stop carting all of this winter gear around for "just in case" situations - even now, you never know when it'll snow.

There have been assessments of my region's status with regard to what kind of shape we'll be in for the upcoming forest fire season*. The amount of snow we got this winter was 53 percent of the average. Hello, global warming, not-so-nice to see you. Anyway, that part is mildly worrying. But, you know, there's the part about how the Beast burnt up a whole load of the forest last year, so between that and the controlled burning that happened this winter, we're probably going to be okay.

...I know it isn't even April yet, but I wish we could skip straight to June, please. May is going to be a very hard month for all of us here.

Anyway, my mate Gray linked me to a compilation of 40 minutes of Mongolian folk metal by 2 different bands, and it's pretty groovy. Check it out. (Well, technically it's 3 bands, but Ego Fall only has one song in this playlist.) I think I like the songs by Tengger Cavalry the best, especially "Horsemen" in particular. Definitely going to have to look up more of their stuff later.

Oh, another neat thing: sparklingdali posted a rec list of Czech and Slovak movies set during the Protectorate, which is of course relevant to my interests (even if it's such a depressing subject) and oh mannn, I want to watch all of these. Going to have to hunt them down. Our tastes do align in a lot of ways, so I expect I'll like most of them (or, well, be stirred by them, at least. Considering the topic and all. Not exactly happy film-watching, here). …a pátý jezdec je Strach/And the Fifth Horseman is Fear has been on my to-watch for ages, but most of these other ones, I haven't heard of them. Per the recommendation, I'll probably watch the new, recent, non-Czech Anthropoid before tackling Atentát, the old Czech interpretation of that operation. Other than that, no idea which one I'll watch first.

I've heard some very good things about Czechoslovak cinema, though not a lot of specific things, so viewing the older films will probably be very interesting... Unfortunately, at this point, the only Czechoslovak film I've seen was Kladivo na čarodějnice/Witchhammer, which I had a lot of mixed feelings about. I think I would have appreciated it more if I'd looked up the background beforehand, because while I did understand that the witch trial setting was an allegory for/response to communism, I didn't realize that the film was made only a couple of years after the Prague Spring, and that this was one of the specific things it was responding to. No surprise, then, that the film was banned in Czechoslovakia almost immediately after it was released.

While I'm on the subject, if there are any Central/Eastern European films that you guys like, I'd love to hear about them. Any country/time period/genre, it's all good. I need more CE/EE stuff on my to-watch list in general.

...Anyway. Ugh, I've got a long week ahead of me. Will I go to sleep at a reasonable time? Who knows!

Weekly Check In March 26

Mar. 26th, 2017 11:47 pm
tassosss: We are not plotting your destruction. Really. (destruction)
[personal profile] tassosss posting in [community profile] thisfinecrew
Sorry this is going up practically tomorrow. Today got busy.

Housekeeping

Reminder that we have a suggestion post if there’s a topic that you’d like to see discussed but would like to ask the mods to look into. This can be anything from general information, or a how-to-do-a-thing, or something you may want to discuss as a community. Folks are welcome to post directly to the comm as always, but if you’re not comfortable/don’t have spoons, we can help too.

Discussion

Republican's healthcare plan went down, what's next?
Resist Days March 31-April 2 - resist everything topic with the goal of 1000 events around the world

Get Involved
Strategy live chat to protest the Keystone Pipeline

Tools
Use Resistbot to use texting to fax your reps. It's extremely easy.

Upcoming Protests
April 1: March for Health
April 15: Tax Day March
April 22: March for Science

News to know
(this section is light this week because I'm getting it up late.)

Russia
Trump campaign has been under investigation since July
Chair of House Intelligence Committee's latest stunt could backfire

Healthcare
Linkspam: It was a busy week in healthcare


How is everyone doing out there? Let me know if you want me to add categories to the check-in poll.

Poll #18113 This week
Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 5


I

View Answers

called my one senator
2 (40.0%)

called my other senator
2 (40.0%)

called my representative
2 (40.0%)

called my governor
1 (20.0%)

called my state reps
0 (0.0%)

sent and email/letter/postcard/fax
4 (80.0%)

donated money to a cause
4 (80.0%)

went to an in person activist group
1 (20.0%)

participated in an online training or call
1 (20.0%)

went to a protest
0 (0.0%)

.

View Answers

signed up for daily alerts
1 (25.0%)

took care of myself
3 (75.0%)

not a US citizen but worked in solidarity in my own community
0 (0.0%)

did something else
3 (75.0%)

committed to action in the coming week
2 (50.0%)



[syndicated profile] notalwaysright_feed

Posted by Not Always Right

Library, Call Center | USA

(I work for a call center for the public library system in my county. We’re the main phone line for the entire system as well as a hotline where patrons can call and ask us anything. I’ve been on the phone for several minutes with a customer who has a bad connection but refuses to call back, so there’s a lot of static on the line. She’s been asking for phone numbers in another state, and I’m coming up with nothing. Finally she asks for a number in-state and I mistakenly give her incorrect information, which gets her very irate and she begins to yell at me.)

Me: “Ma’am, I’d like to continue helping you, but you’re going to have to be civil and patient with me. You cannot yell at me.”

Patron: *angrily* “You don’t need to know why I need this phone number! My sister could be having a crisis so just give me the number!”

Me: “Ma’am, I never asked why you needed it. I’m trying to find that number, but you need to be patient with me while I look for that phone number.” *I finally find it and get ready to give it to her*

Patron: *in a low, growling voice* “I want to cut your eyeballs out of your head and fry them in a f****** frying pan.”

Me: “Ma’am, I’m terminating the call.” *hangs up*

The post Feast Your Eyes On Me Hanging Up On You appeared first on Funny & Stupid Customer Stories - Not Always Right.

(no subject)

Mar. 26th, 2017 09:44 pm
skygiants: Sophie from Howl's Moving Castle with Calcifer hovering over her hands (a life less ordinary)
[personal profile] skygiants
So I tried an experiment to see if it was possible to make a Howl's Moving Castle book vid using Howl's Moving Castle movie footage. Results: ???

(Results mostly that I need to get better at figuring out how to change targeted colors in Adobe Premiere, let's just pretend it's fine.)

Title: In Which Sophie Expresses Her Feelings In The Absence Of Weedkiller
Music: "You're A Cad," The Bird and the Bee



Download link
[syndicated profile] notalwaysright_feed

Posted by Not Always Right

Department Store | Omaha, NE, USA

(I work in the garden center of a large department store. We only have two cash registers, but only use one unless it is really busy. We are incredibly busy one day, with a line six or seven deep, so I open up the second register. Just as I do so, the first register requires a manager override.)

Me: “Ma’am, I can help you over here.”

Customer: “Thank you!”

Me: “Are you paying with a debit card today? This register will freeze if we try to use a debit card and we would need a manager to reboot it.”

Customer: “No, I’m not.”

Me: *checks out her items* “That will be [total], please.”

(Customer uses her debit card. The register freezes.)

Me: “You processed it as a debit card. The register won’t accept it and it’s frozen now.”

Customer: “Well, just cancel it.”

Me: “I can’t. The register won’t let me do anything at all.”

Customer: “Then check me out on the other register.” *the other line hasn’t moved for several minutes*

Coworker: “We can’t. I need to void an item that needs manager approval.”

Customer: “Then call a manager.”

Me: “We have. The only manager that can unlock the registers is on the other end of the store, and they have to deal with the registers up front first. It could be a little while depending on how busy they are.”

Customer: “Well, maybe you should learn how to use your machines.”

Me: “We know how to use the registers. I told you it won’t take debit cards, you used a debit card, and now both machines are frozen.”

(This goes on for about ten minutes, with me explaining over and over that, no, I couldn’t do anything without a manager, yes, I have called for them multiple times, and no I didn’t know how long they would be.)

Customer: “Well, fine! I’ll just go up front where they know how to do their jobs!”

(A manager came back about two minutes later. The line was cleared five minutes after that.)

Related:

To Give Credit Where Debit Is Due, Part 5

To Give Credit Where Debit Is Due, Part 4

To Give Credit Where Debit Is Due, Part 3

The post To Give Credit Where Debit Is Due, Part 6 appeared first on Funny & Stupid Customer Stories - Not Always Right.

WisCon

Mar. 26th, 2017 07:46 pm
resonant: Brian from The Breakfast Club: Demented and sad, but social (Default)
[personal profile] resonant
Just registered the whole family for WisCon -- it seemed too much of a waste to be this close, and still have the kidlet at home, and yet miss the chance.

Anybody else going?
sovay: (Claude Rains)
[personal profile] sovay
It's been a long week. Have some seventy-three-year-old escapism. It worked for me.

I watched On Approval (1944) because it was on TCM and I had Clive Brook on the brain after rewatching Josef von Sternberg's Underworld (1927) last week; I am recommending it because it turned out to be one of the funniest and oddest movies I have seen of its era, Busby Berkeley and the Archers included. I can make it sound relatively normal if I describe it as an acrid comedy of misalliance in the tradition of Noël Coward and Oscar Wilde, all good lines and bad behavior—when a rich, exacting widow engages her titled but impoverished suitor for a month of platonic trial marriage in a remote cottage in the Highlands, the cross-purpose arrivals of their respective best friends throw the experiment hopelessly awry and everybody gets, if not what they wanted when they arrived, then at least what they deserve by the time they leave. You will get a much more accurate idea of the experience of actually watching this thing if I mention up front the parodic use of stock footage, the fallible, interactive narrator, the surrealist dream sequences, and the rampant fourth-wall-breaking. The film opens with a deafening montage of ripped-from-the-newsreels warfare—dogfights, depth charges, incendiaries, anti-aircraft guns, all of which the doughty newsreader's tones of Gaumont's own E.V.H. Emmett survey more in sorrow than in anger. Nostalgically, he attempts to encourage the narrative back to the halcyon tranquility of the pre-war years, only to discover a riot of jitterbugging teenagers zooming around on motorcycles, mashing in the back seats of motorcars, and littering in the parks; in order to get away from this "age of speed and noise so much like war you hardly notice the difference," he's forced to hopscotch back over World War I and the Edwardians before relaxing at last into fulsome praise of the late Victorian era, its gentility, its restraint, and especially its gender roles. "Women were women and they didn't forget it!" However much the narrator may blather on about the virtues of the shy, modest Victorian maiden as opposed to that deadly assertive creature the modern girl, however, the camera is slyly on the side of the women, showing them smiling stiffly at the fatuous attentions of their menfolk and gritting their teeth through afternoons of needlepoint and piano. The film's very premise puts the lie to the submissive myth of the angel in the house, as the narrator will discover when he follows some of the ladies to a night out at the theater. They are going to see the "terribly daring" new play On Approval; in the pages of the program a sharp-eyed viewer may discern photographs of the film's principals in character. The narrator perks up: "Perhaps we're going to find out just why they were called the Naughty Nineties." If he has a hat, you hope he's hanging on to it. He has no idea what he's in for.

On Approval was Brook's last major work in film—he would appear in a handful of TV parts in the '50's and an all-star-cast cameo in 1963—and it is a hell of a swan song as such. He not only directed but co-produced the film with Sydney Box, co-wrote the screenplay with Terence Young, and co-starred with Roland Culver, Googie Withers, and Beatrice Lillie.1 The cast are uniformly excellent and look like they are having a blast, performing their archetypes at just the right pitches of satire or relatability. Lillie's Maria Wislack is a diamond-cut distillation of imperious, icy snippiness who can give as good as she gets with acid-tongued roués like Brook's George, ninth tenth Duke of Bristol, but has perhaps a little more difficulty judging the effect on her tender-hearted intended; that's Culver's Richard Halton, who has the weak-chinned good-sportingness of a Freddy Eynsford-Hill and trims his moustache to the strains of "Ta-ra-ra-boom-de-ay" and has trouble telling whisky from soda, though he can distinguish the color of a woman's eyes. Withers doesn't bother pretending to an American accent as Helen Hale, the pickle magnate's daughter who's renting Bristol House for the duration of the London season; she starts out luminously attentive to her rakish, penniless host, who seems to her the height of British sophistication, but there's steel under her sweetness and those dewy eyes can conceal amused resolve as well as suppressed tears. Brook himself as George reminded me unexpectedly of Alan Rickman, with whom he shares a saturnine deadpan and the ability to say flamboyantly cynical things while barely opening his mouth, as if the object of his insults were hardly worth the enunciation. He could go toe-to-toe with Lord Henry Wotton for world-weary epigrams and has a habit of interesting himself unstoppably in the affairs of his friends, especially when they don't want him to. He does not get all the best lines. It is only partly his fault that everyone ends up at Maria's cottage near Kyle of Lochalsh with no servants willing to wait on them and only a dinghy to get them on or off the island, after which the Highland weather promptly goes down the drain in solidarity with the help and the quartet's interactions take on the ominous chemistry of vinegar and baking soda. I was prepared for the movie to go all sorts of places after the prologue and generally it did, but I did not expect it to give me flashforwards to Bruce Robinson's Withnail & I (1987)—as the rain plinks merrily through the fifteen different leaks in the roof and they only have fourteen pots and bowls to catch it in, George buttoned to the chin in an extraordinary plaid overcoat slumps against the kitchen wall and moans, "My stomach is cold, my head is hot, my arteries are hardening—only alcohol will get me on the train." I had just time to think "I must have some booze. I demand to have some booze!" before Richard replied briskly and unsympathetically, "Nonsense. Never again will I raise a finger. Besides, you shouldn't have drunk all the cooking sherry," and then we had to pause the film so that I could explain to [livejournal.com profile] derspatchel that I was laughing because George was just lucky they didn't have Ronsonol lying around in the 1890's. I also admit that while I watched this movie for Brook, I didn't expect to see quite as much of him as I did thanks to one scene which finds him indolently knees-up in a too-small bathtub with only some suds and a well-placed sponge to preserve the innocence of the British Board of Film Censors. God knows how this picture was even released in the U.S. Nine-tenths of the itchy, twangy tension in this film would dissolve at once if anyone just had sex, but the platonic terms of the trial—and the laws of comedy—preclude it, so everyone sublimates furiously into dialogue as fast and sharp and innuendo-riding as screwball. Or, in Helen's case, just murmurs sweetly into Richard's ear: "Tell her to go to Hell."

As with Charles Laughton and The Night of the Hunter (1955), I can't believe Brook never directed anything else. He has an incredible sense of what works on film and how far he can push the theatricality of both the action and the camerawork. I named Wilde and Coward as influences, but more than anything else On Approval made me think of movies from the 1960's when Richard Lester was throwing every cinematographic absurdity at the screen that would stick. It's not enough to reflect the increasing claustrophobia and dissatisfaction of the passing weeks in the characters' dialogue or manner; we get a hectic montage of creaking oarlocks, clattering dishes, and Maria striking over and over the opening chords of a song that goes "I'm just seventeen and I've never been—" until we're afraid to find out just what she's never. All two-person conversations are cross-cut with their opposite numbers, breaking down apparent lines of alliance or showing up supposed matches to devastating contrast. A pair of intercut nightmares include a talking moose head and a balletic passage in hilariously pretentious slo-mo which then undercranks itself à la Benny Hill to catch up. The narrator is behind the eight-ball to the last, mixing up the details of his characters' lives and receiving from them the amusement he deserves:

"Tell me, Duke, how did you lose your money?"
"Women."
"Yes, I know; I mean your big money."
"Big women!"
2

Brook and Young adapted the screenplay from Frederick Lonsdale's 1926 stage hit of the same name; TCM tells me it was Brook's idea to translate the action from the Roaring Twenties to the Victorian era, on the theory that the racy premise would be even funnier in a more famously repressed age. I think not only was he right in terms of immediate payoff, the spoofing effect of a lavish period setting—costumes by Cecil Beaton—with a satirically modern sensibility is one of the reasons On Approval hasn't dated at all, because not many people were pulling that kind of stunt in 1944. You could double-feature it with Bryan Forbes' The Wrong Box (1966), is what I think I'm saying. I applauded the ending gag at home, in my own office, because I had never seen anything like it outside of the photography of Angus McBean. Plus the story remains both funny and clever about its battle-of-the-sexes tropes in ways that hold up in the era of third- and fourth-wave feminism, which I suspect is even more unusual than being visually ahead of one's time. I regret that I cannot point everyone toward instant gratification on YouTube, but it looks as though the film may be available on Blu-Ray and has streamed on Amazon in the past. Grab it if you see it in a library sale. This social experiment brought to you by my not at all straitlaced backers at Patreon.

1. Despite a five-decade career on stage, Lillie made only seven feature films, of which the best are considered the silent Exit Smiling (1926) and On Approval. One of the others is Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967), which is where I turned out to have seen her and about which I feel very awkward.

2. I've seen this kind of imploding narrator in one other movie from the '40's, Leslie Howard's The Gentle Sex (1943). If anyone knows of other examples, I'd love to hear about them.

Check-In – Day 26

Mar. 26th, 2017 07:05 pm
samuraiter: (Default)
[personal profile] samuraiter posting in [community profile] writethisfanfic
In the beginning, there was —

Well, this isn't the beginning, really. We've been at this for a while. Hello, hello! Good to be back as your host again for the last week of the month. What have you been doing?

— Thinking. Maybe a little, maybe a lot.
— Writing.
— Planning and / or researching.
— Editing.
— Sending things to the beta.
— Posting!
— Relaxing, taking a break, etc.
— Other stuff-ing. Look at the comment.

And a good question for a Sunday: What are you gearing up to do with your writing as the new week begins (and the end of the month approaches)? How are those goals looking at this point?

High… On Tipping

Mar. 26th, 2017 11:00 pm
[syndicated profile] notalwaysright_feed

Posted by Not Always Right

Pizza | Pflugerville, TX, USA

(I am delivering pizza and see that the next house is in my neighborhood. Walking up to the front door, I can smell weed. I ring the doorbell. Customer #1 opens the door and I can clearly see that his eyes are bloodshot.)

Customer #1: “Hey, it’s the pizza guy!”

Me: “Hi, your total is $16.59.”

Customer #1: *talking to his friend* “Hey! I thought you paid for this over credit card?”

Me: “Uhm…” *pointing at receipt* “It says it’s a cash order.”

(At this point everyone was running around trying to figure out what to do, so I just hand them the pizza. Then Customer #2 walks out.)

Customer #2: “So, we think we’ll pay with credit card.”

Me: “All right, just call back at [Pizza Store], and they should fix your order.”

(Customer #1 rushes towards me, panting and out of breath.)

Customer #1: “Okay, so I think we’re paying cash.”

Me: *confused* “Uh… Someone just said that they’re paying with credit card?”

Customer #1: “That’s weird. Well, I’m paying with cash.” *puts a wad of money in my hands*

(At this point, I’m really confused on what’s happening. As I’m walking back to my car, Customer #2 runs out and hands me a $10 bill. I made $25 in tips and they eventually called the store to pay in credit. Best. Night. Ever.)

The post High… On Tipping appeared first on Funny & Stupid Customer Stories - Not Always Right.

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