owlmoose: (cats - tori carrier)
Here is a list of all my currently active public accounts on the Internet. Will be kept updated as things change.

Journals and Micro-blogging

Dreamwidth: [personal profile] owlmoose
My journal and my primary home base on the Internet. Personal posts, political posts, fandom posts, cross-posting of fic and other announcements. If it's important, it will end up here sooner or later.

LiveJournal: [livejournal.com profile] owlmoose
A mirror of my Dreamwidth. As of this writing, and for the foreseeable future, I cross-post all DW entries to LJ and allow comments in both places. If that ever changes, I will make ample announcement. I also use my LJ to participate in a few communities.

Twitter: [twitter.com profile] iamkj
Brief daily life tidbits and interesting links. This is where I'm most likely to share the kind of links I used to share via Google Reader. December 2016 update: Probably the place I am most active and interactive right now.

Tumblr: [tumblr.com profile] lifeofkj
Mostly reblogs (fandom, politics, cute animals), quick fandom thoughts, and daily life spam. Increasingly, I'm posting my fic here first, as well, although anything worth saving will end up cross-posted to AO3. As of December 2016, less active, although I still usually check in at least a couple of times a day.

Fanfiction

AO3: [archiveofourown.org profile] owlmoose
Fanfiction. This is my fanfic archive, complete starting in November 2009, and some older works are there as well. Some things will be posted to DW or Tumblr first, but AO3 will always be the place to find the definitive version.

FF.net: owlmoose
My older work, all Final Fantasy X/X-2. No longer updated with new stories as of December 2007.

Writings of an Owlmoose
My WordPress-based fanfiction archive, complete through December 2010. December 2016 update: I forgot to renew this domain and lost everything that I had posted here. Everything that once lived here is crossposted elsewhere and I currently have no plans to reactivate it.

Other

GoodReads: owlmoose
Updated sporadically. I intend to use it more regularly in 2012.

Pinboard: owlmoose
Links to cool and useful things. Mostly for my own saving purposes rather than sharing, but I'm always happy to add people to my network!

This list is current as of December 17, 2016. Subject to change as communities and my online participation shifts. Feel free to add or follow any of these accounts! I have a fairly free add-back policy. :)
owlmoose: (kh - roxas)
Was I really going to post three times a week this month? So much for that. I'm really behind on writing other things, too. I took a brief business trip this week (to a meeting in Southern California), but that's no real excuse since I was back to my hotel room every night before nine. Then again the trip was fairly draining, especially since my flight home got in four hours late.

We did start Mass Effect: Andromeda yesterday and are still on the first set of missions (what feels like the tutorial level). Started with f!Ryder, of course. I feel like it's too soon to have an opinion, really, but it's got promise anyway. There's some housework and chores to finish first, and I have evening plans, but I hope we get a little more in this afternoon. I'll probably be taking a semi-hiatus from Tumblr for the duration; we'll see.

Otherwise not much to say really. We're going to DC and New York for a week next month, so I'm looking forward to that. I hope you are all well!
owlmoose: (stonehenge)
We finished Season One last night, and holy forking shirt. I am so eager to see what comes next.

Anyone want to talk about it? Spoilers in the comments, yes please.
owlmoose: (lost - hurley dude)
  • A presidential appointee to an EPA leadership position is stepping down because staffers won't play along with his climate change denial agenda. "They’re here for a cause," he said. A cause, like, say, protecting the environment? WHO KNEW.

  • The New York Times and The Washington Post Are at War, and Everyone Is Winning: when two major news organizations are trying to out-do each other in their investigating efforts, there can be no losers (except maybe the Republican administration).

  • I could share a lot of links about the Day Without Women, the strike scheduled to coincide with International Women's Day last week, but I already wrote a whole post about it, so I will limit myself to this New Yorker piece, The Women's Strike and the Messy Space of Change.

  • Ever wonder why the big news always seems to break at night? The Atlantic has a good explainer; the short version is that newspaper publishing deadlines are at night, we're just now getting the stories as soon as they're filed, rather than having to wait for the next morning to read them.

  • Some professors at NYU staged a gender-swapped version of the three Clinton-Trump presidential debates, and did not get the reactions they were expecting from the audience. There's a clip from the rehearsal, which is fascinating to watch. I'd be really curious to see the whole thing.


For your Thursday funny/cute, I commend you to Olly the Terrier have the time of his life at a dog show skills competition. The announcer's affectionate amusement makes it even better.
owlmoose: A bright blue butterfly (butterfly)
Title: A Home by the Woods
Fandom: Critical Role
Rating: G-ish
Wordcount: 1000
Characters: Percy/Vex
Spoilers: Set vaguely after episode 89, spoilers to that point (though nothing too specific).
Notes: Written for the "a picture is worth a thousand words" challenge, where participants receive a photo prompt and write a story of exactly one thousand words based on it. My photo was Silent Shadow (Finding Alice) by Alexandra Bloch.

Also on AO3.

Summary: On the eve of an important event, Vex goes for a walk in the woods.

Vex always feels most herself in the forest.

From their childhood, Vax preferred the hustle and bustle of cities and towns; while Vex acknowledges the many charms of urban life (good food, cute shops -- and cute shopkeepers -- soft beds...), every so often she needs a day away, needs to trade cobblestones and buildings and prying eyes for soft earth and ancient trees. A day to breathe deeply of fresh air, feel dappled sunshine on her cheeks, listen for the small sounds of abundant life -- wind brushing through leaves, insects creaking, birds chirping, the cry of a distant eagle. Alone, with her bear and perhaps her brother for company, Vex can journey into the woods and find solace there.

Not every day, but some days, she awakens to wooden beams over her head instead of the open sky, and knows she needs to make her escape. On one such day, she rises, dresses, and wakes Trinket -- all quietly, so as not to disturb the man still asleep beside her -- and then goes, snagging some bread and cheese from the kitchen on her way out. As she leaves the castle for the woods, she feels her breath come easier, her shoulders lighten as the trees rise around her and the rustle of wind in the leaves fills her ears. An hour in, she finds a likely fallen log, covered with moss and dead leaves, and sits, pulling out her breakfast and scratching Trinket behind the ears while they watch the sun rise.

Read more... )
owlmoose: (quote - questions)
I have returned! Yet another successful FogCon: in the books. Probably jamming two days into one post is too much, but no matter how much I tell myself I can wait for tomorrow to write about today, the fact is I'm very unlikely to do it.

My first panel of the day might also have been the best of the con, and certainly the one that I heard the most people talking about over the rest of the weekend. It was entitled "When Do You Pick Up A Blaster?" and was about revolution: how revolution is depicted in speculative fiction, what fiction gets right and wrong, what can we learn about real-life uprisings from fictional ones, and what is, or should be, the tipping point for the decision to use violence as a tool. One of the panelists, guest of honor Ayize Jama-Everett, suggested that there are types of violence other than physical, namely social and economic violence, and said that the "objective of violence is free the colonized mind from the colonizer. How you define violence is an interesting topic -- another panelist said that he doesn't consider property damage, like bombing empty buildings and shattering store windows, to be the same thing as violence, and although I'm not convinced I agree, it's an interesting point. (Or going back to the previous point, you could consider it a form of economic violence against the property owners). To cover the discussion property would take better notes than I took, but a few other points I wanted to consider: a definition of revolution as when the unimaginable becomes commonplace; the suggestion that you should be willing to risk dying before you risk killing; that you lose something when you fight, even when you win (sometimes it's worth it, but take the costs into considerations); revolution will always take longer than you think it will. As you might imagine, I got a lot to think about here, and took more notes than during any other panel. Lots of discussion centered around the Black Panther Party, and although I'm going to save most of my book recs for another post, I wanted to make note of one here: Black Against Empire, a recent history of the Black Panthers.

Lunch was the annual FogCon banquet, where I sat with friends old and new and chatted about a number of things -- for one, I ran into a fellow Dragon Age fan, and then we decided to stop boring the rest of the table to death and talk about the Hugos instead. Then my afternoon consisted of two guest of honor events. First was an interview with the other guest of honor, Delia Sherman, who talked about her writing process and her stories. After that, Ayize Jama-Everett gave his GoH presentation, a conversation with Afrofuturist Lonny Brooks. The theme of the talk was Jama-Everett asking Brooks to help him imagine a future that isn't bleak. A challenging project in these times, but I think also a worthy one. Some of Brooks's ideas included looking at Peter Diamandis and his thoughts on abundance, platform cooperativism (a worker-centric alternative to the so-called sharing economy promoted by companies like Airbnb and Uber), and diverse communities that celebrate difference rather than fighting against it or practicing separatism.

After dinner -- I crashed an event for members of a writing message board, and had a great chat with a doctor from Illinois whose name I unfortunately cannot remember -- was my one panel of the con, "Between the Pixie and the Crone: Middle Aged Women in Speculative Fiction". Other members of the panel included the aforementioned GoH Delia Sherman and the always-entertaining Ellen Klages, so that was not intimidating at all. Unrelated in any way to the panelists (they were all great), the discussion got tense in a couple of places, which I think is a risk with any panel on a topic that deals in a trope about women at a con that tries to be feminist -- it's going to hit too close to home for some people, feel completely off the mark to others, and it's easy to fall into talking stereotypes. But overall I think it went pretty well. Folks seemed engaged, asked good questions and made good recommendations, and almost no one left before the end, which are all positives, and I got to make most of the points I had planned, including a comment about not falling into the trap of defining all women by their relationship to motherhood, even including women who are mothers, which got a little "whoop!" from someone in the crowd. Last up was a panel on podcasting, which focused almost exclusively on fiction podcasts and never even got to fannish pop culture reviews, although I did get to rec Black Tapes and found a few new shows to look up. Afterwards I wandered by the bar, where I hung out for a little bit before bedtime.

Today I took it a little easier, as I usually try to do on the last day of the con. The first panel of the morning was the guest of honor reading, which I always try to attend and almost never disappoints. I was completely sucked in by Ayize Jama-Everett's reading and bought all three of his books (the only other time that's happened was all the way back in FogCon2, after Nalo Hopkinson read from The Chaos). For lunch I walked over to the farmer's market with [personal profile] forestofglory, and after I went one last panel on how to write dystopian fiction in the age of alternative facts. The panelists agreed that, for all the stories where false information is commonplace and fed to people by the government, no one ever saw coming that we would impose the world of wrong facts on ourselves, without a repressive regime forcing us into it. The discussion was mostly about real-world information bubbles and info overload, less about fiction, but it was still interesting. As usual in this type of conversation, I walked away convinced that librarians are more necessary than ever, and I need to do a better job of turning my information literacy skills into political activism.

Next up: WisCon! Two and a half months away, and I can hardly wait.
owlmoose: (lost - sawyer)
It's actually now the end of Day 2, but last night I was out and about and doing stuff, and I haven't had many opportunities to sit down and take some notes. Much much good stuff has happened today, too, but I want to keep this shortish as I need to get to bed soon, so for now I'll limit myself to yesterday.

Yesterday I went to four events. First up was a panel that ended up more of a round table discussion on how games of all kinds are changing. It's a pretty broad topic, but we still managed to hit the three major types of games -- tabletop (meaning board and card games), role-playing games, and videogames -- and many current trends in gaming, both good and bad. Topics included the role of Kickstarter (great for board games and card games, perhaps less suited to videogames), the rise of co-op board games and how that might relate to the popularity of Pokemon GO, and the ways in which gaming relates to learning, such as this research on virtual reality games as a potential treatment for dementia.

The next panel I attended was entitled "Looking Forward/Looking in the Mirror", regarding the ways in which stories about the future inevitably reflect the time in which they were written. The panelists freely admitted that this question has a different weight to it than it would have in early November, and there was some speculation about how speculative fiction written in the next year or so might change. One panelist freely admitted that she has much less interest in writing dark futures right now, to the point that she's trying to revise story to give it a more hopeful ending. There was quite a bit of talk about Arrival, and the ways in which it sometimes feels like we're living in a dystopia right now (to quote Debbie Notkin, "Get me out of this bad Harry Turtledove novel!"

Next up was dinner with [personal profile] forestofglory and Robyn, a writer who we'd sat next to during the previous panel. After that we went to our last formal panel of the night -- which Robyn happened to be on, although we'd already been planning on it -- which was about writing across genres. Discussion began with the question of why we have so many sub-genres in speculative fiction anyway; marketing is the obvious answer, although some panelists also talked about the value of knowing what to expect from a book before you open it. Sometimes you want a new and exciting experience from a story, but sometimes you want predictability, and ultimately there's nothing wrong with that. Of course, this brought us to one of the inherent dangers of cross-genre writing, because when readers doesn't get the experience they were expecting, the resulting disappointment can affect book sales and reviews. The panelists, who were all pro authors, each brought up various examples from their own experiences, some causing more trouble than others. Someone in the audience asked why genre bending seems to be more of an issue with speculative fiction than other genres, and after some discussion we all came up with an intriguing theory: other genres of fiction (mystery, thriller, romance, etc.) tend to be defined by their plot structures, while speculative fiction genres are defined by their elements (spaceships, wizards, being set in the future...) but can follow almost any structure. I suspect this makes specfic highly flexible but also gives the writer more places to "go wrong" in terms of reader expectations. In the end, the panelists concluded that you can't be too worried about those expectations -- write the story that calls to you, and worry about how to sell or market it later. Lots and lots of book recs out of this one.

Last but never least: ConTention, the annual tradition where a bunch of con attendees get together and argue for an hour and fifteen minutes. This year's debates included some oldies but goodies (Star Wars vs. Star Trek, privacy vs. safety) and some newer ones (The Force Awakens vs. Rogue One, what's the scariest Dr. Who monster, can WorldCon survive if it continues to be primarily based in North America).

And now it's late (and soon to be even later, yay Daylight Saving Time), so I'll come back with today's report tomorrow.
owlmoose: (CJ)
Happy International Women's Day!

I hope that today's events lead both to a continuing groundswell of the progressive actions that have been going on for years but came into focus for many more with the Women's March in January, and to a greater recognition of International Women's Day in the United States. Interesting reading: this Slate article on the history of International Women's Day, which discusses its roots as a day of strikes and pro-worker action through a defanged and commercialized holiday somewhat akin to Mother's Day. (Also an excuse for self-styled wags and MRAs to complain that there's no International Men's Day. Which: 1. shut up; 2. November 19th, in case you actually care; 3. It's during White History Month and Straight Pride Week, duh.)

Although I'm wearing red today, and ate breakfast at home instead of going out as I often do on workdays, I haven't varied my routine much otherwise. I contemplated not working, but since I'm on a major deadline and had a couple of meetings, I decided it would inconvenience the wrong people without sending any useful messages. I felt a little bad about it, but I also firmly believe that every person needs to decide this sort of thing for themselves. I have heard and sympathize with some of the criticisms that not every woman is in a position where they can afford to take a day off work and/or care-taking; I think that's legit, but I've also seen too many women -- and by this I mean the well-off white women who could most likely take the risk -- use that criticism as an excuse not to participate. In the end, if trusting women is important -- and I believe that it is -- then we need to trust women to evaluate their own lives and know what actions are appropriate for them. We can critique the larger meaning of an action without getting too bogged down in the choices of individual women. I'll be interested to see if any statistics come out about the aggregate effect of Day Without a Woman, and if the strike tradition continues.

(Post title is from a Peter Gabriel song, "Shaking the Tree".)

GYWO Bingo

Mar. 6th, 2017 05:53 pm
owlmoose: (ffix - garnet)
The [community profile] getyourwordsout community is running a bingo for participants, and they've taken a tack I've never seen before: pictures of potential settings.



As mentioned on my last writing goals post, I'm really excited to try this out, and I already know where I want to start. Should be interesting, at least.
owlmoose: (Default)
I was tagged by [tumblr.com profile] shadowedhills! Even though I was tagged on Tumblr I'm posting it natively here, because that's just how I roll these days. I'll tag some people on both sides.

RULES // POST 10 RANDOM FACTS ABOUT YOURSELF AND PASS IT ON 15 PEOPLE

1. I love coffee and used to run on the stuff, but I had to cut back because of reflux reasons. I'll drink one regular each morning, then switch to decaf after lunch.

2. I am considerably more likely to enjoy a video game if it has good music. Right now I'm rediscovering the Phoenix Wright series and how much I love the Cornered! theme, one of the most epic songs ever.

3. I'm really nearsighted and have been almost my entire life. I got my first pair of glasses at age 6, then switched to contacts when I was 16. I've not seriously considered surgery even though I'm well within the range where it could be fixed (-6.50 in the right eye, -7.50 in the left). If I ever get to a point where I can't wear contacts anymore, I might think about it more.

4. I have a hard time just watching TV and not doing something with my hands meanwhile. Lately, it's hand-held games that don't have time constraints and don't take a whole lot of thought -- Flight Rising coliseum battles, Angry Birds, Bubble Spinner, things like that. I've considered trying out adult coloring books for this purpose, too.

5. I don't like raw tomatoes, but cooked into sauce they are one of my favorite foods.

6. Meanwhile, I'm happy to eat whole or slivered almonds, but anything flavored with almond oil, or that involved almonds ground up, I can't stand.

7. Although I consider myself a Californian through and through, I was born in Ohio, then lived in small-town Iowa until I was 13. (That's when we moved to CA, and except for college I've lived here ever since.)

8. The first time I ever drove a car, my family's Volkswagen camper, I got confused driving around the streets where we lived, mixed up the accelerator and the brake, and plowed into a fence. The neighbor was very nice about not reporting the accident, but we did have to pay for the fence and some rosebushes.

9. When I was in sixth grade, my music teacher broke us into different vocal parts for the first time. I was assigned to sing alto, and I was so upset at not getting to sing the melody that I actually cried. Fortunately, it didn't take long for me to discover the joys of harmonizing, and now I can't imagine singing any other way.

10. Today is my 44th birthday. The older I get, the less I stress about age as a number. Am I exactly where I expected I'd be at 24, or even 34? Not especially, but for the most part I'm content with where I ended up.

Tagging! On DW/LJ I will tag [personal profile] umadoshi, [personal profile] lassarina, [personal profile] firecat, [personal profile] elainegrey, [personal profile] heavenscalyx, and [personal profile] spindizzy. Totally optional as always. :)
owlmoose: (think)
Anyone else think that they referred to last night's speech as an address rather than his first State of the Union as a ploy to keep expectations low? Just me? Okay.

  • If it was intentional, it sure seems to have worked -- mainstream media spent last night and today falling all over themselves to congratulate the president for his ability to read words off a teleprompter without melting down. Way to set a high bar, folks. At least some articles, like this commentary from NBC, pointed out his lack of substance and a fair number of the "alternative facts" contained in the speech.

  • Meanwhile, the known rabble-rousers at USA Today posted an editorial calling for Congressional Democrats to get serious about potential impeachment.

  • This week in "I Miss Jon Stewart": Stewart's appearance on Late Night with Stephen Colbert on Monday, 2/27, in which he compared the media's relationship with Trump to a bad breakup and advised them to move on. Nice analogy. I wonder how long they'll wait before taking it to heart?

  • A special election for three seats in the Connecticut state senate was a wash, with all three seats remaining in the hands of their original party, but both Democratic-held seats were won easily, while the race for the GOP-held seat was more competitive than it had ever been. Democrats also held a state senate seat in Delaware, won narrowly in 2014, by over 10 points on the strength of 33% turnout -- which is huge for a special election. There's plenty more of these coming, so keep your eye out. Here's an article about some upcoming US House races in Montana and Georgia -- the Georgia seat, especially, could be key to gathering momentum for the midterms.

  • I would say the dominos are falling when Darrell Issa -- terrible GOP rep from Southern CA, who led some of the worst investigations of Obama and Hillary Clinton, and was largely responsible for the California recall election that brought us the Governator, and who came very close to losing his seat in a district that Clinton won in 2016 -- is calling for a special prosecutor to look into the Russia shenanigans, but he walked it back just a day or so later, so.... *shrug* Talk is cheap, folks.

  • My main feeling about the election of a DNC chair is to be glad its over, so now the party can buckle down and get to work. But what really elevated the whole thing to a non-event to me was Tom Perez, immediately and without rancor, naming Keith Ellison vice chair to unanimous approval. This way, we get both of their voices in party leadership, and Ellison gets to keep his seat in Congress (although nothing prohibited him from staying on, he had promised to resign if he'd won). As far as I'm concerned, this is a win-win. As for the people who tried to turn this into a proxy battle to re-litigate the primary, meh. If you're leaving the party over this, you were looking for an excuse to go. See ya bye bye now.

  • One of the big stories last week was members of Congress ducking constituent town halls during their recent recess (mostly Republicans, but not exclusively -- I don't think Pelosi or Kamala Harris had one, and I know Feinstein didn't). Lots of folks are calling them out, but none better than Gabrielle Giffords.

  • Another thing you might have heard about was the Department of Education pulling guidance to schools that explicitly protected the rights of trans students. Bad as this news is, no laws have actually changed here, just the federal government's mandate to interpret them a certain way. The National Center for Transgender Equality provides a FAQ explaining what it all means.


Lastly, for today's bit of fun: here's a livetweet of a cow escape in upstate New York. Watch the gifs, revel in the puns, and read all the way down for a happy ending.
owlmoose: (owl)
Days written: 20/28
Words written: 5,126
Words of fic written: 2,356
Stories worked on: Six
Stories posted: Five

Charts are not so surprised, it is February after all. )

Well, work got suddenly super busy this month (two major deadlines, yay); combine that with Hugo reading and my blitz through a couple of Ace Attorney games, and I suppose it's not too surprising that I'd have a down period. At least I succeed in my big-deal goal of getting the second part of Wardens of Ivalice posted!

Specific goals:

1. Write an average of six days per week. No, and I should have known better. February is always a down month; if I'd had five days each week as my target, I would have hit it easily.

2. Annual WIP triage and target a fic to finish in February. I went through my WIPs, but I actually didn't find that much -- just a half-started epic about Marissa Hawke in DA:I that I decided was more epic than I wanted to deal with.

3. Hugo recommendations post. Done! Posted as part of a group effort at [community profile] ladybusiness.

4. Write and post stories for [community profile] monthlysupergo, which I'm trying out as a lightweight prompt community. They're doing a random characters challenge this month, a game I can never ever resist. Although I overdid it by requesting two prompt sets, I still managed to write and post four ficlets.

March is a toughie -- I have a con and a work trip, and Mass Effect: Andromeda is out soon, and although one work deadline is past the other is likely to ramp up, but I don't want to set the bar too low. Also I have a dearth of major projects right now, and I'm trying to decide whether to embrace the break or cast about for something new to work on. At the moment I'm thinking the former, despite the havoc it will wreak with my GYWO counts, but I'm open to inspiration. Anyone know of any good Big Bangs launching soon?

1. Write an average of five days per week, including while traveling.

2. Between unfinished [community profile] monthlysupergo prompts, whatever that community does for March, the Final Fantasy Kiss Battle, and a bingo card I requested from GYWO but haven't gotten yet, write at least four flashfics.

3. Write and post story for [livejournal.com profile] picfor1000, a 1000-word fic challenge I signed up for in January (due March 31st).

4. Post at least three times a week (including Lady Business posts).
owlmoose: (ffx2 - gippal scissors)
I didn't get my act together to do a DA/Bioware/some other combo of Western RPG fandoms battle together in time for Valentine's Day (maybe the last week of February, when I'm not quite as busy with work or an impending concert week), but [personal profile] seventhe is hosting one for Final Fantasy!!

http://seventhe.dreamwidth.org/392208.html

I'm off to check it out now, and if you have any interest, I recommend you do the same.
owlmoose: photo of little owl in a stocking cap (owlhat)
I'm trying to keep these to stories and links that I think have long-term use, rather than responding to whatever particular outrage has happened within the last fifteen minutes. There's just no way to keep up with a White House and Congress that's churning out stuff at the rate things are coming in a long-form journal, so I'm not even going to try. I do my best to keep up on Twitter, which is the best source for whatever is the latest and "greatest" anyway.

Anyway, have some links.

  • From former Congressman Barney Frank, a guide on how to make your opinions known to your elected representatives. There are some good points here, but one of the things I appreciate most is that he doesn't try to claim that one and only one contact point is the "right" one. There are many useful ways to engage; pick the one that works for you, or take a multi-pronged approach if you like.

  • "Our Part in the Darkness": this opinion piece, by Rabih Alameddine in The New Yorker, isn't a comfortable read, but I think it's an important reminder that we Americans should not attempt to distance ourselves from our country. Like it or not, support it or not, fighting against it or not, these things are happening here, and while 45, his minions, and his strongest supporters may be extreme examples, less stark examples of their beliefs and actions have always been part of the American landscape. Although not addressed directly, this article gets at why I'm not comfortable with the "not my president" formulation -- I may not have voted for him, I may have done my damnedest to keep him out of the office, but now he's here and he is the president, and I can't look away from that reality.

  • Two on the upcoming fight over Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch, one from Politico and another, much angrier but with a similar takeaway, from journalist Kurt Eichenwald. The short version, with which I agree, is that this is where Democrats need to take their stand. If they lose the filibuster, so be it. A stolen Supreme Court seat is worth making a fuss over, and although I wish they had pulled out the big guns while Obama was still in the White House, better late than never.

  • Good advice on living the resistance from Bernice King, daughter of Martin Luther and Coretta Scott King. I've been seeing this circulating without attribution quite a lot, so I wanted to make sure to get a direct link in here.

  • While I'm thinking about it, can I just complain about how much I hate the "cut and paste this text on your Facebook page" methodology that's gotten so popular for sharing essays and action items? I understand people's security concerns about not making FB posts public -- I almost never do it myself -- but it's a nightmare for source verification. There's got to be a better way.

  • Going back to Coretta Scott King, I know I just said I wanted to stay away from outrage of the day in my linkspam posts, but this thing where Elizabeth Warren was barred from speaking in the Senate for reading King's letter laying out the proven racism of then-nominee for Attorney General Pete Sessions is so egregious that I have to bring it up. First, a Tweetstorm on the history of the gag rule in the Senate, which was created to keep abolitionists from as much as mentioning slavery on the floor. Second, if you haven't already seen it, the full text of the letter is available in a lot of places now; this link goes to the Boston Globe (which also has an overview of the story). Finally, you've probably seen the new Nevertheless, She Persisted meme -- based on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's exact words when asked why Warren was silenced -- which is possibly my favorite rapid response weaponized meme yet. If you haven't looked at the Twitter hashtag yet, I highly recommend it.

  • From Vox, why the president is not an evil genius, and why that doesn't matter. I agree with both the initial premise of this (if the man and his top advisors were actually evil geniuses, the Republican administration would not be nearly so chaotic right now), and the upshot, which is that the outcome of the administration's actions is more important than their reasoning behind each one. This, for what it's worth, is why I avoid the "distraction" rhetoric that we hear so often these days -- "don't pay attention to this thing, it's just a distraction from that other more important thing!" Everything they are doing is terrible, and it all matters. Of course there's too much for all of us to focus on all the time -- we each have to triage for ourselves. But as the wise [twitter.com profile] sophiebiblio says, we shouldn't shame people for having different priorities.


  • If only. If only...
owlmoose: (da - brosca)
The Dragon Age Kiss Battle got so little participation the last time I ran one, in 2015, that I didn't do it last year, and no one asked where it was. So maybe I should just assume that the time for this game has come and gone... and yet, I also feel like it could be the perfect thing for a tough time, to have some no-pressure, light-weight fandom fun.

So I throw it out to the masses. If I ran a Dragon Age kiss battle (here's the 2012 edition, for anyone who's not familiar), would you play? Would you create, leave prompts, and encourage others to do the same? My biggest concern is actually prompts; so few people left prompts in 2015, and without prompts there's no game.

Let me know your thoughts! And if your honest thought is "sorry, no one cares about that any more", I genuinely want to know. Thanks.

Hmm

Feb. 2nd, 2017 05:21 pm
owlmoose: (star trek - bones and sulu)
My WIP triage didn't turn up much to work on next. Just one story really, a Hawke in DA:I epic that's way too big to finish in one month. I don't want to start a new giant thing immediately after finishing up a different giant thing.

Any suggestions?
owlmoose: (da - nathanial)
Title: The Rising Mist
Fandom: Dragon Age and Final Fantasy XII
Rating: Teen (moderate DA-typical violence)
Wordcount: 26,903
Characters: Ashe, Balthier, Basch, Penelo, Fran, Elissa Cousland, Alistair, Nathaniel Howe, Alim Surana, Sigrun, Leliana, Zevran, many others.
Spoilers: Yes, for all three games and Dragon Age 2. Contains a couple of DA:I references but no spoilers.
Notes: So. I kept saying I was working on it, and here it is. Only five and a half years later. Many, many apologies for the wait, but I'm really happy to be able to share it now. A couple of comments. First, because huge chunks of this were plotted and written before DA:I came out, it's not entirely compliant with its canon. Second, huge thanks to everyone who ever talked story meta with me (names that come to mind are [personal profile] sarasa_cat, [personal profile] lassarina, and [personal profile] alias_sqbr, although I'm sure that's not everybody), and especially to [personal profile] justira for providing an amazing and detailed beta read, above and beyond the call of duty. Finally, my love to everyone who left a review on Part One asking for more, or who commented with enthusiasm whenever I added WoI to my monthly writing goals. Knowing that people were looking forward to this second installment kept me pushing forward, and I look forward to being able to say it's finally completely done whenever I get to writing Part Three (currently targeted to publish in 2018).

Posted on AO3.
owlmoose: (ffix - garnet)
Days written: 25/31
Words written: 8,357
Words behind on GYWO: 4,393 (but I mostly edited this month so that's not really surprising)
Words of fic written: 3,928
Stories worked on: Three
Stories posted: One, plus an exchange fic that went live

Charts can't think of any particularly creative cut text. )

1. Write an average of six days per week. If you don't count the time I was traveling, I'd say this is a yes.

2. Beta pending, finish and post Wardens of Ivalice, Part 2. Close. Sooooooooo close. Look for this in a day or two.

3. Undertake the annual WIP triage, and target one fic to finish and post either this month or in February. This got pushed aside by Wardens of Ivalice editing. Next month.

4. Finish and post at least one [community profile] fandom_stocking story (due on 1/5). Success, but sort of cheating -- I didn't make the original deadline; instead I volunteered to write for someone who needed more gifts. Anyway, the fic is here.

5. Write and publish my Hugo recommendations post. No, although I did write a 2016 media in review post for [community profile] ladybusiness. But it's not a proper Hugo post because it includes media not published in 2016. This will also appear next month.

Speaking of next month: goals for February. I'm not even going to include posting Wardens of Ivalice; that's a gimme.

1. Write an average of six days per week.

2. Annual WIP triage and target a fic to finish in February.

3. Hugo recommendations post.

4. Write and post stories for [community profile] monthlysupergo, which I'm trying out as a lightweight prompt community. They're doing a random characters challenge this month, a game I can never ever resist.
owlmoose: (otter)
Welp, here we are. Day 7. Here's hoping we make it the rest of the way.

  • More proof that California is not remotely fucking around: Governor Jerry Brown's State of the State address. He's previously had some strong words on taking action against climate change, but he laid down the law on a bunch of other issues too: immigration, healthcare, etc. California has 10% of the nation's population and the world's sixth largest economy; that's a lot of weight to throw around, and I fully support doing it. I have friends who keep making noises about a "Calexit", but I think that's both mean-spirited and short sighted. We need to be leading the charge against Trumpism, not running in the other direction.

  • Protest Works: Jamelle Bouie on the power of the 1/21/17 Women's March and why it proves we need to stay on the offensive.

  • Fortunately, it looks like there are a lot more protests in the works: The Scientist March (no date set yet, but they seem to be moving quickly), the Tax March on April 15th, a National Pride March on June 11th (I might even try to get to DC for that one). I think a big protest every two months, with rapid response gatherings in response to specific things like the immigration rallies yesterday and the GOP gathering in Philadelphia today, sounds about right. I hope we can keep it up.

  • As these protests, marches, and rallies come together, I hope that we can be mindful of the many legit criticisms of the Women's March around intersectionality. This is one example, on race issues, but there are many, many others. We can celebrate the good aspects of the march while still listening to the critiques, learning from them, and trying to do better next time.

  • From 2016 but always relevant: Why Rep. John Lewis is not to be trifled with.

  • One of my favorite pieces of resistance (much as I hate that it needs to be done) are the "rogue" Twitter accounts being created by government employees to get around the limits that the new administration has been placing on the spread of information. Unofficial accounts for the National Park Service and individual parks, NASA, the EPA, the USDA, and over a dozen others have started popping up. [twitter.com profile] StollmeyerEU is maintaining an updated list here. Who knew that, when the revolution came, that the National Park Service would be leading the way? (Well, maybe this lady.)


And for today's bit of fun: remains of giant prehistoric otters have been found in China.
owlmoose: (think)
I went to the Women's March in San Francisco today. Because there was an anti-abortion protest earlier in the day (organized months earlier -- they do a march here on the anniversary of Roe v. Wade every year), city officials asked the organizers to make their event later, so the rally started at 3pm. It was a little weird, being at home and watching all the pictures and reports coming in on social media when my march was still hours away.

I ended up only walking about half the march route, for two reasons: rain, and T came along with me despite crowds not being at all his scene, and I didn't want to push him into overdoing it. Still, even if I didn't participate as fully as I could, I'm so glad I had the chance to be part of this amazing and historic event.

Some pictures I took are posted on my Tumblr, and I linked to a few others.

I haven't been to many protest marches, but I always leave them feeling supported and invigorated. Now to turn those feelings into action, tomorrow and every day that follows.
owlmoose: (narnia - edmund coat)
Hmm, I need some Critical Role icons.

Title: Sibling Rivalry
Fandom: Critical Role
Rating: GA
Wordcount: 2011
Characters: Percy and Cassandra, mention of Percy/Vex
Spoilers: through episode 73 ("The Coming Storm")
Notes: Written for the 2016 round of Winter's Crest gifts, to a request for a story about the complex relationship between the de Rolo siblings, especially in light of the revelations in episode 73. Set in a slight AU of Episode 74 (giving Vox Machina an extra day in Whitestone).

Summary: Percival and Cassandra sometimes have different ideas about how much information she needs to have to properly rule Whitestone. A conversation, a fight, a reconciliation.

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